A bored painter, that saw a new way of exploring art

Ellsworth Kelly, “Notes of 1969,” in Ellsworth Kelly (Amsterdam: Stedelijk Museum, 1980), 30-34. Text slightly revised by the artist in 1993.

Ellsworth Kelly, in the year starting in 1949, created works of figurative paintings. He then changed to works that were object oriented. He realized he lost the interest in 20th century abstract and figurative paintings. “All the art since the Renaissance seemed too-men oriented. I liked (the) object quality.” “Instead of making a picture that was an interpretation of a thing seen, or a picture that was an interpretation of a thing seen, or a picture of invented content, I found an object and “presented” it as itself alone.” This first artwork was “Window, Museum of Modern Art, Paris” done in 1949.Ink and pencil on paper, 16 ½ x 12” (41.9 x 30.8 cm) .Kelly, seemed to really find himself as an artist. Something he mentioned about this artwork was “After constructing “Window” with two canvases and a wood frame, I realized that from then on painting as I had known it was finished for me. The new works were to be objects, unsigned, anonymous.” Kelly felt like he had freedom and he was assisted with the subject of the artwork. He believed that there was no need to compose any longer. There was a blogger that was so interested in Kelly’s work of art that he created a poem about an artwork that Kelly created in the year of 1965.

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Above: “Red, Yellow, Blue II,” (1965) Acrylic on canvas 82 x 189 in. (208.28 x 480.06 cm)

James Gapinski, “The Color of life, after Ellsworth Kelly’s “Red, Yellow, Blue II”, (2005-06) Tap Milwaukee Jornal Sentinel.

James Gapinski created a poem called, “The Color of life” in Spring of 2007 written after Ellsworth Kelly’s painting entitled “Red, Yellow, Blue II,” (1965) Acrylic on canvas 82 x 189 in. (208.28 x 480.06 cm) to this day, is hanging in the Milwaukee Art Museum. This artwork is an example of the three primary colors. In Gapinskit point of view, Kelly’s work is “regimented, fixed, and uncompromising in their status as separate entities.” Gapinski found the way of love for the artwork of Kellys and soon understood it more.

– Caroline Booth

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Left: “Window, Museum of Modern Art, Paris” done in 1949. Ink and pencil on paper, 16 ½ x 12” (41.9 x 30.8 cm)

 

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